Annalise’s Kidney Abnormality: Part II

So if the title leads you to think you missed something, you probably did! Read/skim Part I to catch up.

Opening Scene: the proud and sleep-deprived Mama brings her 6-week old daughter to the Radiology department at the UVa hospital for precautionary tests.

I haven’t actually met the urologist yet, but I am sitting here waiting for Annalise to have two tests. First, she’ll have a VCUG, which, as explained by the nurse (over the phone), will test for any reflux from the bladder. Apparently this is a common problem associated with kidney abnormalities. So I’ve heard a lot about the VCUG on mommy boards on the internet. I’ll later find out the results are extremely important when it comes to urinary tract infections, which can turn into bladder infections, which then can become kidney infections (each with increasing risks). Reflux is measured on a scale of severity, but any reflux is a problem with which to be dealt. This makes me nervous.

After the VCUG, we’ll have an ultrasound; this time it will not be a prenatal one. The technician will probe Annalise’s tummy and compare her kidneys. They are looking for any more dilation, and a better understanding of her anatomy, which seems to be abnormal.

After these tests, a normal patient would go upstairs (and through the woods, and around the pond) to the middle of nowhere the Urology clinic and go over the results. But since we’re local (and more flexible), we get to come back another day and meet with the urologist. Joy. I just love the whole hospital experience – let’s drag this out do this again!

Still with me? Because right now, I’m still sitting in the waiting room, with the buzzer that the receptionist gave me after checking in. Am I waiting for a table at Outback, or to place my baby on a cold table? It’s easy to forget where you are with the windowless room and the fluorescent lights... Anywho, Annalise is by far the youngest here. But probably noone in the room suspects that she is the one who is the patient. We hadn’t  people-watched waited long, before we are called back.

I wheel the stroller back to a room with equipment that towers over the room. I try to swallow my fears, and follow the nurse/technician’s instructions: take off Annalise’s clothes; put this HUGE gown on her little body; remove her diaper. She’s not too upset – until they take her and try to insert a catheter. It’s the smallest catheter I’d ever seen – and I think it was still too big for her little private parts. She’s in pain, and because she resists, it takes them even longer (and probably makes the pain worse). I am in agony; there is nothing I can do. I try to give her a pacifier (she’d barely even seen one before this day) that was drenched in sugar water (also something new to her). She surprisingly takes to it, but she still sobs between her desperate sucks. I hate standing here, doing nothing, as they strap her down to the table. And I now become associated with her experience of pain, instead of the comforting Mama. The nurses reassure me that the worst is over. Annalise had worn herself out, and she drifts into sleep. They insert some dye into her bladder through the catheter, and they watch it as the machine scans and moves around her. It was pretty incredible to see technology at work. Apparently reflux usually is seen when she pees, so when she did her business, we were done. I would later discuss the results with the urologist, but they say that they didn’t see any signs of reflux.

What a relief. Now unstrap my baby and get me out of here! VCUG – check.

Then I am led to the ultrasound room. It’s nice and dark in there. Calming. Compared to the VCUG, this seems like a walk in the park. Annalise is grumpy from being woken up too soon (who wouldn’t be after getting something shoved up your pee-hole?), but the technician gets the images of the kidneys and bladder. The back door opens (There’s a back door?) and a radiologist introduces himself. Apparently, this is a rare occurrence, but he actually came in to take a second look and get more images. He takes the wand, and after scanning around, confirms the earlier prognosis of a duplicated renal system. He tries to look as deep as possible, but he can’t find where the extra ureter goes. Apparently, a duplicate ureter usually does not drain properly into the bladder (which is what causes the kidney to become dilated) and many times is ectopic. The upper portion of the right kidney still shows dilation, and I’d further talk about the next step with the urologist.

Bummer. More dilation. Probably more tests.

My husband joins us as we come back a few weeks later to the Urology Clinic. After they taped a too-large bag to my daughter collected a urine sample, we meet our urologist. He surprises me – warm, friendly, empathetic, a good listener. Are you sure you are a specialist? He then basically confirms everything that we’d heard from the technicians and doctors before. But he does give us direction – more tests. We’d come back in a few weeks for a kidney scan (which tests the function of the kidneys) and another ultrasound. Then he mentions the dreaded word: surgery. I can’t believe he just threw it out there – the word just hangs in the air. Put on the brakes…we just met you! He probably sees the look in my eyes, because he immediately jumps to reassure us. If Annalise had surgery, it would be a ways down the road, and it’s a non-invasive, laparoscopic surgery, with very short recovery time. Oh, and then he mentions that Annalise should be on a daily antibiotic. Why? The VCUG showed no signs of reflux? Just preventative, precautionary…ha! that’s what we have heard all along! So we pick up the prescription on the way home, and Annalise begins her love affair with medicine that very night.

Next stop: more tests at UVA.

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2 Responses to “Annalise’s Kidney Abnormality: Part II”

  1. Annalise’s Kidney Abnormality: Part III « Baked With Yeast Says:

    […] last time, we were leaving the pediatric urology department with a prescription for a daily antibiotic and a […]

  2. Annalise’s Kidney Abnormality – Part IV « Baked With Yeast Says:

    […] we heard the news that Annalise will need corrective surgery on her right kidney. (See Parts I, II, and III to catch […]

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